Windsor

Candidates face critical residents at doorsteps across Windsor-Essex

Some residents told aspiring MPs they wished politicians were more truthful, while others wondered how a federal party may compare to its provincial counterpart. CBC News followed some candidates as they canvassed different neighbourhoods in recent weeks.

One candidate was confronted by someone who wants politicians to be more honest

Tracey Ramsey, the NDP candidate in the Essex riding, speaks to resident William Bishop while canvassing. (Jason Viau/CBC)

Candidates of all stripes are facing tough questions at Windsor-Essex doorsteps.

Some residents told aspiring MPs they wished politicians were more truthful, while others wondered how a federal party may compare to its provincial counterpart. CBC News followed some candidates as they canvassed different neighbourhoods in recent weeks.

"What I can tell is about me," said Conservative Windsor-Tecumseh candidate Leo Demarce, while door-knocking in east Windsor. "I can't tell you what the provincial party is doing because, again, it's not anything I have any control over."

Leo Demarce, the Conservative candidate in Windsor-Tecumseh, looks for support while knocking on doors in the city's east end. (Jason Viau/CBC)

That's how Demarce responded to concerns over some PC government cuts in Ontario, and what those cuts may signal if the federal Tories form government.

More honesty

While campaigning in LaSalle, Essex Liberal candidate Audrey Festeryga was confronted by someone who wanted politicians to be more honest.

"Integrity is very important to me," said Festeryga, when responding to a resident who wished that "everyone would be a little bit more truthful."

Essex Liberal candidate Audrey Festeryga knocks on doors in LaSalle. (Jason Viau/CBC)

Essex NDP candidate Tracey Ramsey — who won the riding in 2015 — approached a supporter who had reservations about going orange again this election.

"I've been a supporter of the NDP for 35 years, but lately I don't know. Not a lot is being done," said William Bishop.

Ramsey said she plans to keep fighting for Essex on the national stage, adding that affordable housing and prescription medication are desires she's hearing from residents.

Issues in Windsor-Essex

"A lot of people tell me that they're very happy to see that Essex is being highlighted in that way," said Ramsey. "For me, pharmacare is a very big issue ... because it makes good economic sense, people need to be able to afford their medication."

Aside from job security, Festeryga said she's hearing that people "really want a voice at the table."

"Writing letters and photo ops just isn't cutting it anymore," she said. "It's important to have representation that can get something done."

In Windsor-Tecumseh, Demarce said the vast majority of people are telling him affordability is top of mind. Eliminating the federal carbon tax is one way he said his party would reduce costs for Canadians.

"That hits us on so many levels, including your day-to-day groceries, your home heating bills," he said.

About the Author

Jason Viau is a video journalist, TV host and radio newsreader at CBC Windsor. He was born in North Bay, but has lived in Windsor for most of his life. Since graduating from St. Clair College, he's worked in print, TV and radio. Email him at jason.viau@cbc.ca

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