Windsor

'It's all you can do': Tecumseh residents upgrade sump pump to combat flooding

Nick and Nadia Komar built their home on the Tecumseh waterfront almost 30 years ago. Concerned about the potential for flooding this year, the couple invested in sump pump upgrades as a way of preventing rising water levels from damaging their home.

A fully functional sump pump can mean the difference between a dry home and flooding

Nadia Komar, left, and Nick Komar, right, spent approximately $2,000 upgrading their home's sump pump to prevent flooding. (Sonya Varma/CBC)

Nick and Nadia Komar built their home on the Tecumseh waterfront almost 30 years ago. Concerned about the potential for flooding this year, the couple invested in sump pump upgrades as a way of preventing rising water levels from damaging their home.

The couple spent approximately $2,000 to double their pump's horsepower, add a new backup battery and install a water pressure pump which filters fluids even if the sump pump isn't functional.

According to Nick Komar, the backup battery is capable of surviving for seven hours in the event of an electricity failure. 

He plans on adding a sump pump activity monitor that will beam usage updates directly to his smartphone. 

"Say for instance all systems break, then it'll be activated on my smartphone that you better come and take a look at it," he said.

Nadia said the sump pump upgrades are only the latest in a series of home upgrades undertaken by the couple to combat flooding.

The couple previously spent approximately $70,000 to increase the height of their break wall, and already added two extensions to their sump pump outlet as well. 

"There's nothing else you can do," said Nick Komar. "Nobody wins here."

Check your sump pump twice a year

Mark Beaudoin is the owner of Plumbing Now in Windsor. 

He said any sump pump older than 10 years should be replaced, adding homeowners should inspect their pumps at least twice a year. 

"If there's no water in it, you should run water into it," said Beaudoin. "Get a hose, let the water run and see if the pump will pump on its own without you manually having to test it."

Beaudoin also said homeowners should check to make sure their pump's pit is clean and not bogged down by rocks or other debris. 

"If necessary, you really should be adding a backup system, because there are a lot of power outages," he said. "Battery backups are preferred over water, because they pump more gallons per minute."

According to Beaudoin, pumps which were manufactured for water conditions 20 years ago should be replaced with newer models.

"They can't keep up to the volume of water anymore. We're getting more severe weather and you need to have a better pump in your home," he said. "Twenty years ago, the pumps you put in were probably good enough, but today they're not."

With files from Sonya Varma

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