Windsor

Indigenous youth march on Parliament, Windsor rally shows support

A Windsor rally was held to show support for Indigenous youth marching on Parliament Hill. The protest was because of the Canadian government’s delay on promises made by Justin Trudeau.

'It's a reconfiguration of Indigenous peoples'

“It feels like everything is happening above and around us instead of including us,” said Rebecca Major. (Katerina Georgieva/CBC)

More than a dozen people rallied on Windsor's riverfront to show support for Indigenous youth marching on Parliament Hill Tuesday.

The protest was because of delays in delivery of promises by the Canadian government to Indigenous peoples.

The Federal Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework legislation was supposed to be tabled this fall, but a draft has yet to be developed.

Derrick Biso attended the protest and says the proposed framework is trying to circumvent the autonomy of the nations involved. 

"It's a reconfiguration of Indigenous peoples within the Canadian legal apparatus," said Biso, who was standing in "solidarity," though not Indigenous themself. 

The Federal Recognition and Implementation of Indigenous Rights Framework legislation was supposed to be tabled this fall, but a draft has yet to be developed. (Katerina Georgieva/CBC)

Biso said they have heard the framework described as a "cage."

"It's a backtrack on progress to ensure certainty for investors," said Biso. "A framework that is benefiting the ruling class, the wealthy industrials."

Protest co-organizer Michelle Nahdoo says it's like reconciliation, which she calls a "great idea," but says "the action has to be implemented."

A Windsor rally was held to show support for Indigenous youth marching on Parliament Hill. (Katerina Georgieva/CBC)

"We recognize that the youth are taking a stand and going to Ottawa to have their voices heard," said Nahdoo. "It was decided amongst community members that we need to take a stand for our youth because our youth are not as visible here in Windsor. So we're here for them."

Rebecca Major, Metis and new to Ontario, said a lot of people are not informed about what's happening. 

"It feels like everything is happening above and around us instead of including us," said Major. "This is about the future, [the youth] should be more widely included in the conversation."

The Assembly of First Nations called for a pause this summer and asked for a recalibration of the process to develop the framework.

The framework is not expected to be completed before the next federal election

With files from Katerina Georgieva

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversation  Create account

Already have an account?

now