Windsor

Gordie Howe Bridge has rare species looking for new homes

The City of Windsor is looking for new homes for rare plants and animals that will be displaced by the new Gordie Howe International Bridge.
The Butler's gartersnake is one of several species to be displaced by the Gordie Howe International Bridge. (Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources)

The City of Windsor is looking for new homes for rare plants and animals that will be displaced by the new Gordie Howe International Bridge.

Staff is recommending council direct the city's executive director of parks to provide relocation sites for species at risk and provincially rare species found on the site of the new international crossing in west Windsor.

A report heads to council Monday.

According to that report, the following species at risk are known to be present within, or in the vicinity of, the project:

  • Butler's gartersnake.
  • Eastern foxsnake.
  • Dense blazing star.
  • Willowleaf Aster.
  • Colicroot.
  • Kentucky coffee tree.
  • Dwarf Hackberry.
  • Common hop tree.
  • Bank swallow.
  • Riddell's goldenrod.

Some previous relocation was done in 2013, including the relocation of dense blazing star and willowleaf aster and tallgrass prairie sod mats to the St. Clair National Wildlife Area.

In 2014, three Butler's gartersnakes were relocated to Black Oak Heritage Park adjacent to the bridge site.

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