Windsor

Farmers in fear ask provincial attorney general for help

"Our children are coming into contact with threatening behaviour toward farmers," says Essex County's Vicky Morrison. "I'm just not happy about that."

The letter was sent to the attorney general, the solicitor general and the agriculture minister

Warwick, a township in Lambton County, Ont. is looking for stricter protections for farmers — or even new legislation to keep them safe. (Christopher Furlong/Getty Images)

Warwick, a township in Lambton County, Ont. is looking for stricter protections for farmers — or even new legislation to keep them safe.

The town council there has written a letter to the provincial attorney general after incidents with protestors have left area farmers in fear. 

Vicky Morrison, a dairy farmer in South Woodslee and chair of the Essex County Milk Producers said when protesters showed up to a farm she was at, she was afraid for her children.

The Jobin Farm every year hosts 'Breakfast on the Farm' where the general public is invited to see how the farm process works. 

"Activists entered the barn, they videoed everything." said Morrison. "How anyone could see something wrong with a barn where the cows were in complete comfort .. it's a brand new barn."

Morrison said after taking video, the protesters stood outside the barn while other guests entered and yelled things at them.

"Our children are coming into contact with threatening behaviour toward farmers," said Morrison. "I'm just not happy about that."

Listen to Vicky Morrison speak with Peter Duck on Windsor Morning:

Vicky Morrison is a dairy farmer in South Woodslee. 9:38

According to Morrison, the Ontario Provincial Police were called to the event to deal with the protestors.

"It left a sour note on the event," said Morrison. 

At Morrison's farm in South Woodslee, they've used bales of hay to block the edge of their property after noticing protestors stopping on the roadway.

"I have no trespassing signs up," said Morrison. "Police tell us to just ask the protesters to nicely leave. I don't think they'd like us just walking onto their property. Why don't we have the same rights?"

Monica Reynolds, a member of Windsor Animal Action Group, was one of the activists at the breakfast — but she said they left the farm to start their protest.

Reynolds also said a police officer did come, but had no problem with what they were doing. 

The motion for consideration, submitted to the attorney general, the solicitor general and the minister of agriculture asks that the province work toward ensuring stronger enforcement of existing laws. 

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