Windsor

Family of passenger killed in 2004 Pelee Island airplane crash suing for damages

A civil trial launched by the family of one of 10 passengers killed in the Jan. 17, 2004 Pelee Island plane crash entered its second day Tuesday. 

Georgian Express and Owen Sound Transportation previously admitted liability

The crash involved a Cessna Caravan aircraft operating as Georgian Express Flight 126. (CBC)

A civil trial launched by the family of one of 10 passengers killed in the Jan. 17, 2004 Pelee Island plane crash entered its second day Tuesday. 

The family of Robert Brisco — one of eight pheasant hunters on on the flight — is suing both Georgian Express and Owen Sound Transportation for monetary damages and punitive damages. 

The crash involved a Cessna Caravan aircraft operating as Georgian Express Flight 126.

In 2006, the Transportation Safety Board of Canada reported that the plane involved in the Jan. 17, 2004 crash was was overloaded and laden with ice.

Georgian Express and Owen Sound Transportation previously admitted liability.

The court heard testimony from several witnesses on Tuesday, including Evelyne Matte — a former cook with the Jiimaan ferry who was at the airport where the plane attempted to land before the crash.

Eight of the victims were from Ontario. The pilot and his Los Angeles-based girlfriend also died on the flight. (CBC News)

Matte said one of the women who disembarked from the plane following the crash looked so scared her face turned white.

Matte added that she heard one of the pheasant hunters complain about ice on the wing. Additionally, Matte said it was possible to see ice on the wing and other parts of the plane.

The civil trial initiated by Brisco's family is expected to take approximately two and a half weeks. 

Corrections

  • An earlier version of this story indicated that Georgian Express was later rebranded as Cameron Air, whereas in fact the two companies are not connected.
    Nov 26, 2019 1:37 PM ET
  • A previous version of this story stated that Transport Canada originally ruled that the January 2004 crash was caused by ice on plane's wing. Instead, it was a Transportation Safety Board of Canada report that said the plane was overloaded and laden with ice.
    Dec 09, 2019 2:58 PM ET

With files from Dale Molnar

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