Deer vs. vehicle collisions spike in November, police warn

Police are warning motorists to keep a closer eye for deer in your headlights during the month of November, especially during dusk and dawn.

If you see a deer on the road, police say to "plow through" instead of slamming on the brakes

In Chatham-Kent on Wednesday, there were two car-versus-deer crashes within an hour of each other. (Supplied/Greg Gilbertson)

Police are warning motorists to keep a closer eye for deer in your headlights during the month of November, especially during dusk and dawn.

The deer only have one thing in mind and that's to mate.- Harbinder Gill, LaSalle police spokesperson

Some law enforcement agencies said November is when they typically see a spike in collisions involving deer and vehicles.

LaSalle police also notice an uptick in car collisions with deer because the animals are "distracted."

"As you can imagine the deer only have one thing in mind and that's to mate, and they might not think of putting their own survival first," said LaSalle police spokesperson Harbinder Gill.

Don't slam on brakes, just 'plow through'

If you see a deer on the road, Gill recommends to "plow through" instead of slamming on the brakes. He said to have both hands on the steering wheel, brace for impact as the airbags will likely deploy and look where you want to go.

"Let's say ... you brake rapidly and your car dips down and what's going to happen? The deer is going to come on to your car, and in some instances it's going to come through the windshield," said Gill. "That's the one thing we want to avoid."

Two deer vs. car crashes within an hour

In Chatham-Kent on Wednesday, there were two car-versus-deer crashes within an hour of each other.

"We thought it was important to remind motorists to use extra caution this time of year, especially when driving between the hours of 6 and 9 during dawn and dusk as this is when most collisions occur," said Constable Renee Cowell.

Cowell recommends motorists watch their speed, look for reflect eyes in the distance and use high beam headlights whenever possible.

"If you see a deer on the road, brake gently and don't swerve as these sudden movements can put you and other drivers on the road at risk," said Cowell.

If you hit a deer, Cowell recommends to pull over and call police.