Windsor

Chief Tecumseh honoured with turtle shell sculpture

A large, new sculpture honouring Chief Tecumseh will be dedicated at a special ceremony on Sunday afternoon, timed to coincide with the anniversary of Tecumseh's death.

The First Nations leader died in 1813 in the Battle of the Thames

A large, new sculpture honouring Chief Tecumseh will be dedicated at a special ceremony on Sunday afternoon, timed to coincide with the anniversary of Tecumseh's death. (A Place of Many Grasses)

A large, new sculpture honouring Chief Tecumseh will be dedicated at a special ceremony on Sunday afternoon, timed to coincide with the anniversary of Tecumseh's death.

The 10-metre, stainless steel work resembles a turtle shell and is now in place at the site of the Battle of the Thames, where Chief Tecumseh died in 1813.

The monument "Wisdom" and is located at a site called "A Place of Many Grasses," signifying all the First Nations who came together two centuries ago during the War of 1812.

"Because of the makeup of the country, where we have a lot more people coming into this country, a lot of people don't even know that a war actually took place between the United States and England at that time, and I think it's good to have that reminder and to create that site where people can come and get their own feelings from there, and get an understanding," said Greg Peters, the chief of the Delaware First Nation at at Moraviantown.

The reserve is located just across the river from the site.

"To me, personally, I feel very pleased that there is a unique sculpture for Tecumseh, because he was a unique man," said Peters. "The sculptor was adamant that it wasn't just for Tecumseh that was being honoured, that it's all First Nations."

Gordon Reeve, was the sculptor who created the monument. 

The work cost $350,000 to create.

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