Windsor

CCAC strike 'complicates things' Windsor hospital CEO says

Those on strike are health professionals who assess people for home care and identify home-care plans for patients in the Erie-St. Clair Local Health Integration Network,
David Musyj claims that every day the hospital discharges 50 patients in need some level of CCAC support. (Aadel Haleem/CBC)

A strike at CCAC “clearly complicates things” at Windsor Regional Hospital, its CEO said Friday morning.

Roughly 270 local Community Care Access Centres employees are part of a provincewide strike.

Those on strike are health professionals who assess people for home care and identify home-care plans for patients in the Erie-St. Clair Local Health Integration Network, which extends from Windsor to Chatham to Sarnia.

David Musyj claims that every day the hospital discharges 50 patients in need some level of CCAC support.

“It does clearly complicate things,” he said.

Those on strike are not contracted service providers care who care for patients in their homes, said Lori Marshall, CEO of Erie St. Clair Community Care Access Centre.

"Current patients would expect to continue receive the same services they receive in the home," Marshall said.

Marshall said new referrals for home care are the patients most affected. New referrals will be assessed in priority, she said.

"There may be slower response time to new referrals," Marshall said.

The Ontario Nurses' Association says almost 3,000 community health workers across the province are on strike today.

The Community Care Access Centre workers are seeking wage increases.

That's after a two-year wage freeze in their last contract, which expired last March.

Bill Marra, who speaks for Hôtel-Dieu Grace Healthcare, says the quality of care will not affect patients or hospital operations.

"Our relationship with CCAC revolves around assessing our patients and facilitating our discharge back into the home," Marra said. "To be very, very honest and clear about this, there is no direct impact on our hospital operations. Patients at the hospital will be dealt with normal protocol."

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