Windsor

Province to cut red tape in the auto sector

The Ford government plans to cut red tape and remove regulatory roadblocks in the auto sector. According to the province, it'll pave the way to more auto jobs. “Every piece of red tape we get rid of is another dollar saved and another job created,” said Todd Smith, Ontario’s Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade.

Government says removing regulatory roadblocks will drive prosperity in the auto sector

Todd Smith, Ontario's Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade speaks in Windsor, Ont. — June 12, 2019 (Jason Viau/CBC)

The Ford government plans to cut red tape and remove regulatory roadblocks in the auto sector. According to the province, it'll pave the way to more jobs in the sector.

Todd Smith, Ontario's Minister of Economic Development, Job Creation and Trade, was in Windsor to make the announcement.

"Every piece of red tape we get rid of is another dollar saved and another job created," said Smith. "Our government is reducing red tape because when our job creators spend less time filling out paperwork, they spend more time creating and protecting jobs for Ontario families."

Smith called the red tape a costly and burdensome irritant in the auto sector, insisting that cutting it would make it faster and cheaper for companies to comply with regulations.

"With less red tape, Ontario will see more investment. That means we need shovel-ready land to help attract the next Honda, Toyota, Fiat Chrysler, GM or Ford. And that's why our government announced a Job Site Challenge to identify job sites ready for the next auto assembler," said Smith.

Smith says auto companies have said the biggest obstacle to expanding their plant is access to large sites. To address this, the government will launch the Job Site Challenge later this summer, outlining site criteria and inviting municipalities and private land developers to bring forward site proposals. These sites will be evaluated, and those that are deemed workable will be internationally certified by site-selection professionals. 

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