Windsor

Asian carp could find plenty of food in Lake Michigan

A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread farther.

The invasive fish have infested the Mississippi River

Asian carp first started showing up in North America in the 70s, when they were brought in for the aquaculture industry in the U.S. (Illinois Department of Natural Resources)

A newly released study says if Asian carp reach Lake Michigan, they probably would find enough food to spread farther.

The invasive fish have infested the Mississippi River and dozens of tributaries. Authorities are debating how to keep them out of the Great Lakes, where fishing is a $7 billion industry.

Some experts have questioned whether there's enough plankton in Lake Michigan to sustain the invasive carp away from shoreline areas. The lake has seen a drop-off in plankton caused by exotic mussels.

But a report released Monday by University of Michigan scientists says the voracious carp could feed on mussel excrement and other organic material when venturing into deeper waters.

Officials say that illustrates the need to prevent the carp from getting into the lake.

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