Windsor

Park House recognized as historically significant by Parks Canada

Parks Canada and the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada unveiled a plaque Saturday commemorating the house's significance.

According to Parks Canada, Park House is 'evidence for the mobility of the French-descended population'

The Park House Museum was established in 1972. The original home was built in 1796. (Stacey Janzer/CBC)

Amherstburg's Park House has been recognized as a national historically significant property. 

Parks Canada and the Historic Sites and Monuments Board of Canada unveiled a plaque Saturday, commemorating the house's significance.

Considered one of the oldest houses in Southwestern Ontario, Park House is a "rare example" of a colonial building found in settlements and fur-trading posts. It sits on Dalhousie Street in Amherstburg, Ont. and was built in the 1770s. 

The house was floated down the Detroit River in 1798 after Britain ceded Detroit in 1796. 

According to Parks Canada, Park House is "evidence for the mobility of the French-descended population" and tells the story of traders and artisans through its architecture. 

Curators and employees of the Park House Museum believe it might be haunted.

Other national historic sites in the region include Fort Henry and Fort Malden.

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