Windsor

More than 730 Henry Ford Health System employees have tested positive for COVID-19

As the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 continue to increase across the U.S., more and more stateside health-care workers are starting to test positive as well — including in places like Michigan.

The number represents 2.1% of the system's entire workforce

The Henry Ford Health System has implemented 'aggressive' steps to prevent the spread of COVID-19. (Tom Addison/CBC)

As the number of confirmed cases of COVID-19 continue to increase across the U.S., more and more stateside health-care workers are starting to test positive as well — including in places like Michigan.

As of 8:30 p.m. on Monday, there are 734 employees, part of the Henry Ford Health System (HFHS) in the Detroit metropolitan area who have tested positive for novel coronavirus. 

In a statement, Dr. Adnan Munkarah, executive vice-president and chief clinical officer with HFHS, said that figure represents 2.1 per cent of the system's entire workforce. 

Munkarah clarified that the number of HFHS employees also includes those "not working directly on the frontlines or those who contracted the virus in the community."

In total, Munkarah said nearly 2,500 employees across his organization have been tested, the majority of whom have tested negative. 

"Our team members are our greatest asset and their health and safety is a top priority as we continue to respond to this pandemic," said Munkarah, in a statement. "In addition to strict adherence to the use of [personal protective equipment] when caring for COVID-19 patients, we have put a number of aggressive safety measures in place including a universal mask policy for all employees and visitors, and the prioritization of testing for team members who are exhibiting symptoms, even if mild."

As of Tuesday, the Windsor-Essex County Health Unit (WECHU) is aware of 17,221 confirmed COVID-19 cases in Michigan, with 5,023 in Detroit alone. 

... We have put a number of aggressive safety measures in place ...- Dr. Adnan Munkarah, Executive Vice-President and Chief Clinal Officer, Henry Ford Health System

Figures on WECHU's website confirm 727 deaths in Michigan and 193 in Detroit. 

Officials on both sides of the Canada-U.S. border made the decision in late March to restrict travel for non-essential purposes. 

Only essential workers, like health-care employees and truck drivers, are currently allowed to cross. 

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