Windsor

400 km of Windsor's roads need repair at cost of $391M

Nearly 400 kilometres of Windsor’s roads require reconstruction of rehabilitation at a cost of $391 million, according to a report to be received by council.

1% road levy would cost taxpayers $27 a year, report finds

The city of Windsor’s road network spans 1,034 km. (CBC File Photo)

Nearly 400 kilometres of Windsor’s roads require reconstruction or rehabilitation at a cost of $391 million, according to a report to be received by council.

The report comes as Coun. Hilary Payne continues to push for a road levy on property taxes.

Payne wants a one-per-cent levy tacked onto any property tax increase that may be forthcoming in 2016.

Payne says the levy would then increase to two per cent in the second year, three in the third and four in the fourth.

He claims the increases would raise $60 million and pave 600 city blocks.

However, the report says “an incremental dedicated capital levy of one per cent each year over four years would result in an annual funding increase of approximately $4 million in cumulative funding over the four-year period.”

The city says that would pave 400 additional residential blocks or completely reconstruct 80 residential blocks.

The report estimates it costs $600,000 to mill and pave one residential block.

It would cost a homeowner with a home valued at the average of $150,000 an additional $27 a year for four years.

Administration is working on a study that will serve as the basis for making long-term, 20-year strategic funding decisions about the city’s road network, which spans 1,034 km.

“It is noted that other asset classes are also in need of additional funding, and it is therefore prudent to adopt a balanced approach to the allocation of available funding,” the report reads.

Road Levy ReportMobile users: View the document
Road Levy Report (PDF 256KB)
Road Levy Report (Text 256KB)
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