Windsor

360-degree film of Canada's vast landscape visits Windsor

A 22-minute film, called Horizon, will be shown 21 times each day, featuring geography, art and people from every province and territory. The production is complete with a soundtrack of Canadian music.

See Canada in an entirely different way, says SESQUI executive producer

(Sesqui Inc.)

The country's jaw-dropping landscapes will be showcased in a 360-degree film screened inside a cinematic red dome set up on Windsor's riverfront over the next five days. 

A 22-minute film, called Horizon, will be shown 21 times each day, featuring geography, art and people from every province and territory. The production is complete with a soundtrack of Canadian music.

The project's executive producer, Andrea Stewart, says the project is part of a Canada 150 signature initiative to show Canadians their country in a new way.

"We're exploring the boundaries of 360-degree filmmaking," she said. "You're going to experience the country in a really immersive way."

SESQUI executive producer, Andrea Stewart, is touring the 360-degree film Horizon across the country as part of Canada 150 celebrations. (Dale Molnar/CBC)

Viewers will be under water with beluga whales, in the middle of a caribou migration and part of performances with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet. 

Windsor is one of seven cities to host the SESQUI dome, so far, as it continues its tour across the country in celebration of Canada 150. The free screenings start Friday and run until Tuesday.

The nine-metre high inflatable dome provides everyone with the same quality of seat, given the film is screened on the inside of the curved ceiling, explained logistics coordinator LaSean Ebanks.

To give Canadians close views of the northern lights and some of the country's finest arts and culture, the dome is towed around the country in two separate trucks. Total setup can be done in about a day. 

"We have more than 80 scenes in the movie from over 50 different places," Ebanks said. 

LaSean Ebanks is the logistics coordinator for SESQUI. (Peter Duck/CBC)