Canada

Canadian election drew nearly 66% of registered voters

Turnout for Canada's 2019 general election was 65.95 per cent of eligible voters, not as high as in 2015 when Justin Trudeau first swept to power, but a strong turnout compared to some past elections.

Strong turnout is a sign of engagement, with 17.9 million people getting to the polls

Elections Canada says 17.9 million Canadians, 65.95 per cent of registered voters, cast ballots for Monday's election. (Graham Hughes/Canadian Press)

Turnout for Canada's 2019 general election was 65.95 per cent of eligible voters, not as high as in 2015 when Justin Trudeau first swept to power, but a strong turnout compared to some past elections.

Of the 27.1 million Canadians registered to vote in Monday's , 17.9 million cast ballots, according to Elections Canada. That number does not include electors who registered on election day.

There were 55,515 Canadian expatriates registered to vote, and a final tally shows 31,798 — a record number — marked ballots.

The Liberals reversed a provision put in place by the Harper administration that stripped expats who had been out of the country five years or more of the right to vote.

A strong turnout is a sign of engagement with the election and its issues, which is why all the party leaders on Monday posted Twitter messages urging their supporters to vote.

Here is the breakdown of turnout by province/territory.

 

In the 2015 election, in which Trudeau gained a majority, 68.5 per cent of eligible voters cast ballots — a turnaround from earlier elections in which voter engagement had soured and voting numbers fell.

Here is the comparison of voter turnout in federal elections since 2000.