Toronto

TTC facing $1M lawsuit from woman pushed onto subway tracks

A 39-year-old woman who was pushed onto subway tracks at Toronto's Bloor-Yonge station last month is suing the Toronto Transit Commission for $1 million.

Plaintiff alleges TTC failed to implement sufficient safety protocols on the subway platform

TTC passengers gather outside Yonge-Bloor station on April 17, 2022 after a woman was pushed onto subway tracks. A 45-year-old woman has been charged with attempted murder in connection with the incident. (CBC)

A 39-year-old woman who was pushed onto the subway tracks at Toronto's Bloor-Yonge station last month is suing the Toronto Transit Commission for $1 million.

Shamsa Al-Balushi was seriously injured when she was pushed onto the tracks on the evening of April 17. She survived by pressing herself against the subway platform to avoid being hit by an oncoming train.

According to a statement of claim filed on Wednesday, Al-Balushi was "terrified" and "screaming in pain" after being pushed onto the tracks. The claim alleges Al-Balushi waited for approximately 30 minutes for someone to help her.

A 45-year-old woman was arrested at Finch GO station the day following the incident. She has been charged with attempted murder.

The claim says that while the assailant who pushed Al-Balushi onto the tracks was not employed by or affiliated with the TTC, the TTC is liable for the incident.

"The TTC is liable for the injuries that Shamsa sustained, in that it failed to implement sufficient safety protocols on the subway platform; failed to provide regular supervision of the passengers; did not have adequate surveillance of the platform; failed to promptly respond to the incident," the claim says.

Lawyers for Al-Balushi claim she suffered a broken rib when she fell onto the subway tracks, and continues to suffer ongoing back and neck pain, as well as physical and emotional trauma and insomnia. 

This screenshot from a video first published by BlogTO shows the moment before Al-Balushi, right, was pushed onto the subway tracks. (BlogTO)

"Shamsa has incurred, and will continue to incur medical expenses, including, but not limited to, expenses for medication, therapy, rehabilitation, medical treatment and other forms of care," the claim says, adding that Al-Balushi was still in the "probationary" period of her new job and is not entitled to benefits through her work.

"The TTC is Shamsa's only option for transportation. She does not own a vehicle and she cannot afford to take taxis or rideshares," the claim says. "Shamsa's continued reliance on the TTC has substantially contributed to the deterioration of her mental health since the Incident."

A spokesperson for the TTC said the transit operator does not comment on ongoing legal matters.

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