Toronto

Toronto to spend more than $550M on construction projects in 2015

Toronto will spend more than $550 million on construction projects this year, as it tries to keep vital infrastructure in good shape.

Already 100,000 potholes filled in this year

Toronto will spend more than $550 million on construction projects this year, as it tries to keep vital infrastructure in good shape.

In total, the city plans to spend $270 million on roads, expressways and bridges, as well as another $230 million on sewers and watermains. Toronto will also spend $62 million on basement flooding protection.

Coun. Jaye Robinson, the chair of the city's public works and infrastructure committee, says 'a large part' of the city's infrastructure is nearing the end of its lifespan and thus is in need of investment. (John Lesavage/CBC)

Coun. Jaye Robinson, the chair of the city's public works and infrastructure committee, told reporters the investments are necessary

"We need to keep our core city assets — our roads, bridges, sewers and watermains — in a state of good repair," Robinson said Wednesday morning.

"A large part of our city's infrastructure is nearing the end of its service life and we need to invest in its renewal and its maintenance. It's critical to our city's continued success and prosperity."

The city has released a list of some of the major road construction projects it will tackle this year. They include:

  • The second phase of the replacement of the west deck of the Gardiner Expressway.
  • Work on the part of Bayview Avenue stretching from Lawrence Avenue West to York Mills Road.
  • Work on a stretch of Birchmount Road between Lawrence Avenue East and Ellesmere Road.
  • Work on both Sherbourne and Lower Sherbourne streets.
  • Work on the part of Lawrence Avenue West that lies between Weston Road and Royal York Road.
  • Work on Highway 27 between Finch Avenue West and Sheppard Avenue West.
  • Work on a stretch of Dufferin Street between Eglinton Avenue West and Highway 401.
  • Work on a part of Lawrence Avenue East, between Markham Road and Kingston Road.

As crews undertake this work, Robinson said the city will be taking steps to "minimize disruptions and keep traffic flowing."

As always, the city is dealing with the repair of potholes that emerged over the winter.

Robinson said the city has already filled in 100,000 potholes in 2015. She reminded residents to call 311 or go online to report any potholes they see.

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