Toronto·Video

Toronto recording studio celebrates 'an incredible ride' on its 50th anniversary

A local recording studio is celebrating a milestone this year. Kensington Sound opened its doors on Baldwin Street in 1972 and that location remains its home today.

Kensington Sound remains in its original location on Baldwin Street where it opened in '72

Toronto recording studio celebrates 50th anniversary

5 months ago
Duration 3:31
A local recording studio is celebrating a milestone this year. Kensington Sound opened its doors on Baldwin Street in 1972 and that location remains its home today. Talia Ricci spoke with the owner about the history of the studio and Toronto's local music scene.

Reflecting on the last five decades, Vezi Tayyeb says his recording studio Kensington Sound has gone through many phases — from being one of the top punk studios to focusing on reggae country and jazz.

"Week to week, you never knew what you were going to record here," Tayyeb said. He pointed out that their platinum albums include one for punk rock band Teenage Head and another for a children's album by Sharon Lois and Bram.

"Those two albums symbolize how eclectic Kensington Sound is," he said.

The studio sits in the same location on Baldwin Street where it opened in 1972 and also still uses some of the recording gear from the 70s, mixed with new technology.

Looking to the future, Tayyeb is forming a program called Bipocular Arts, which aims to create a welcoming environment for diverse up and coming talent.

"We always try to help bands because we're musicians ourselves and we know how hard it can be," he said.

"It's been 50 wonderful years that I didn't expect ... and it's been an incredible ride."

Talia Ricci spoke with the owner about the location's history, and how the Toronto music scene has changed over the decades.

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Talia Ricci is a CBC reporter based in Toronto. She has travelled around the globe with her camera documenting people and places as well as volunteering. Talia enjoys covering offbeat human interest stories and exposing social justice issues. When she's not reporting, you can find her reading or strolling the city with a film camera.

now