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Toronto Raptor Kyle Lowry receives honorary doctorate from Nova Scotia university

Toronto Raptor Kyle Lowry received an honorary doctorate from Acadia University in Nova Scotia on Sunday for being a role model, achieving a level of excellence in sports and giving back to the community.

Acadia University says Lowry is 'inspiring role model' to graduates

Kyle Lowry holds the championship trophy during the Toronto Raptors victory parade in downtown Toronto in June 2019. Lowry and the Raptors beat the Golden State Warriors 4-2 to win the 2019 NBA Finals. On Sunday, he received an honorary doctorate from Acadia University in Nova Scotia. (Getty Images)

Toronto Raptor Kyle Lowry received an honorary doctorate from Acadia University in Nova Scotia on Sunday for being a role model, achieving a level of excellence in sports and giving back to the community.

Lowry, a 2016 Olympic gold medallist in U.S. men's basketball, was one of seven "outstanding individuals" to receive honorary degrees from the university at a convocation held virtually for the Class of 2021 in Wolfville, N.S. He is now a Doctor of Humanities.

In a news release, Acadia University said of Lowry: "He rallied the nation when he led Canada's only NBA franchise to an historic NBA Championship victory in 2019. 

"Lowry and his wife, Ayahna Cornish-Lowry, are committed to improving the lives of the disadvantaged in Toronto and Philadelphia to help them experience a better quality of life. Together, they set up the Lowry Love Foundation, a charity that gives back to community."

Dr. Peter Ricketts, Acadia's president and vice-chancellor, said honorary degrees celebrate leadership in all of its forms.

"Acadia's honorary degree recipients are excellent role models for our graduates. Each one is a distinguished individual who has made a significant impact in their community," Ricketts said in the release.

"By recognizing their outstanding achievements with honorary degrees, we acknowledge them for their many contributions to society. Like them, we know our graduates will take their place in the world and make a difference."

WATCH | Kyle Lowry gives moving speech on how he became a basketball star:

Sherri Turner, university communications director for the president's office at Acadia University, said Lowry was chosen because he has made a difference to society.

"Honorary doctorates are meant to recognize those who have achieved a level of excellence above and beyond any of their peers in their chosen profession, in addition to what they have also given back to their communities," she said in an email on Sunday

"Kyle has done that against challenging odds, and we see him as an inspiring role model to our graduating class."

The other honorary degree recipients on Sunday were former Canadian prime minister Paul Martin; retired senator Hon. Murray Sinclair; Dr. Robert Strang, Nova Scotia's chief medical officer of health; Dr. Gaynor Watson-Creed, the province's deputy chief medical officer of health; Nancy McCain, patron of the arts and education and chair of Acadia's Campaign for Acadia; and Rev. Dr. Malcolm Card, a minister and missionary.

About 2,800 people watched the one-hour ceremony on Acadia's convocation website. Acadia, founded in 1838, has a graduating class of about 850 out of a student population of 3,500.

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