Photos

Toronto Pride in pictures: A collage of celebration and grief

Thousands descended on Toronto's downtown core to march in the city's Pride parade, turning what was an otherwise dreary, grey day into a rainbow of celebration.

38 years on, the event remains a symbol of solidarity for many in the LGBTQ community

Revellers watch from a balcony above Toronto's 38th Pride parade, an event that included both celebration and sombre reflection. (Cole Burston/Canadian Press)

Thousands descended on Toronto's downtown core to march in the city's Pride parade, turning what was an otherwise dreary, grey day into a rainbow of celebration.

The parade, an annual event that has become an enduring thread in the city's fabric, has in recent years also been a source of controversy: from police withdrawing their application to march in the event, to tensions over the handling of the case of alleged serial killer Bruce McArthur.
Thirty-eight years after the first parade, the event remains a symbol of solidarity and celebration for many in the LGBTQ community. 
Here are a few moments, captured in photographs.
The day got off to a soggy start. (Cole Burston/Canadian Press)
However, the dreary day turned colourful as Torontonians descended on the parade route. (Adrian Cheung/CBC)
The rain didn't stop the confetti from flying. (Cole Burston/Canadian Press)
Things turned bold and bright as the parade got underway. (Adrian Cheung/CBC)
Members of the Canadian Forces made an appearance, waving a Pride flag atop a military vehicle. (Cole Burston/Canadian Press)
Parade-goers hoisted a flag of Latin American countries spliced with the Pride flag. (Cole Burston/Canadian Press)
There were some emotional surprises, too, as when Mauro Terentiak spotted his mom, Fernanda Terentiak, in the parade. (Cole Burston/Canadian Press)
Amid the celebration, the parade's political undercurrent was apparent. One reveller turned out wearing a costume of police tape. (Cole Burston/Canadian Press)
As tribute to those lost from the community, some marched with We Will Not Rest #UntilWe'reSafe posters and T-shirts. (Cole Burston/Canadian Press)
And some swapped the rainbows for black attire following behind the main parade in what organizers called the Until We're Safe March in a "tribute to community members lost as well as those who continue to feel unsafe in the community." (Adrian Cheung)