Toronto

High-ranking Toronto cop accused of interfering with promotions process appears before tribunal

A high-ranking Toronto police officer accused of interfering with the promotions process by providing "confidential" information to a handful of officers ahead of their interviews appeared before a disciplinary tribunal Monday.

Supt. Stacy Clarke charged with breach of confidence, insubordination, discreditable conduct

Supt. Stacy Clarke with the Toronto Police Service is charged with three counts of breach of confidence, three counts of insubordination and one count of discreditable conduct. (CBC)

A high-ranking Toronto police officer accused of interfering with the promotions process by providing "confidential" information to a handful of officers ahead of their interviews appeared before a disciplinary tribunal Monday.

Supt. Stacy Clarke — who is charged with seven counts of professional misconduct — made her first appearance before the Toronto police disciplinary tribunal via an online hearing Monday morning. She is charged under the Police Services Act with three counts of breach of confidence, three counts of discreditable conduct, and one count of insubordination.

Tribunal documents from the hearing allege Clarke mentored a number of constables seeking to be promoted to the rank of sergeant last fall, while being part of the panel conducting the interviews.

It also claims Clarke received an email around Nov. 10 instructing her to cut off contact with the officers she was mentoring by Nov. 25.

The notice alleges that in late November, Clarke sent photos of the interview questions to six of the candidates she was mentoring.

It further alleges she provided in-person counselling to one of the candidates at her home on three consecutive days in early December, and on one of those days, conducted a mock interview using questions from panels she had sat on days earlier.

"You conducted a mock interview with H.H., using real interview questions which you knew to be part of the promotional interview package," the document reads.

Clarke accused of not disclosing conflict of interest

The notice alleges Clarke had also later participated in the officer's interview without disclosing her conflict of interest. 

"You failed to make known the nature of your relationship you have with him and the conflict of interest associated with your participation in his interview panel," the document reads.

"In so doing you have committed misconduct in that you did act in a disorderly manner or in a manner prejudicial to discipline or likely to bring discredit upon the reputation of the Toronto Police Service."

Clarke's lawyer Joseph Markson declined to comment while the matter is before the tribunal.

Clarke is currently suspended with pay, according to Meaghan Gray, spokesperson for the Toronto Police Service. Under provincial law, suspended police officers must remain on the payroll unless sentenced to jail time. 

On Monday, the prosecution asked for additional time to seek an external prosecutor in the matter. 

She is set to appear next before the disciplinary tribunal on Feb. 23.

The hearing comes after another high-ranking officer with the Toronto Police Service was charged with impaired driving after a crash in Pickering, Ont., earlier this month.

Supt. Riyaz Hussein, who leads the police force's disciplinary hearings office, is facing charges of impaired driving, careless driving and having open liquor in a vehicle, according to Toronto police.

With files from The Canadian Press

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