Toronto

John Tory goes to Portugal for global technology conference

Newly re-elected Toronto Mayor John Tory is in Portugal to attend an international technology conference this week.

Canadian delegation includes Toronto Coun. Michael Thompson, Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti

Toronto Mayor John Tory will make his pitch to some 70,000 people attending the conference. (Chris Young/Canadian Press)

Newly re-elected Toronto Mayor John Tory is in Portugal to attend what's billed as the world's largest technology conference.

Tory, along with Coun. Michael Thompson and Markham Mayor Frank Scarpitti, is leading a Canadian delegation of about 400 companies, organizations and individuals to Web Summit, which began on Monday and runs until Nov. 8 in Lisbon.

In a news release on Monday, Tory said the trip gives the delegation a chance to promote the benefits of doing business in Toronto and to raise awareness that the city is slated to host Collision, a North American technology conference, for three consecutive years starting in May 2019. 

"Web Summit is the ideal event for Toronto to expand its profile and influence as North America's fastest growing tech community and as the new home for North America's fastest growing tech conference, Collision," Tory said in the release. 

About 70,000 expected at conference

Tory took part in a Facebook Live event on Monday and is scheduled to speak at an eco-system summit at Web Summit.

The Canadian delegation includes representatives from MaRS Discovery District, Toronto Global and Tourism Toronto.

About 70,000 people from 170 countries are expected at Web Summit, which is organized by a Dublin, Ireland based company also called Web Summit.

Collision has been held in New Orleans for the past three years. Toronto's first edition will be held from May 20-23, 2019 at the Enercare Centre.

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