Toronto

Toronto tax hike: Here's how much more you'll pay in the coming years

Mayor John Tory supported the levy tax, saying it’s the best way to generate the billions of dollars the city needs to pay for public transit and more affordable housing.

City building fund going up to pay for public transit improvements and affordable housing

Toronto homeowners will be asked to pay more in the coming years to support better transit and the building of more affordable housing. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Toronto city council just approved a tax hike.

Technically, it's a series of increases to the city building fund, but Toronto homeowners will see it as an add-on to their property tax bill.

Mayor John Tory supported the levy tax, saying it's the best way to generate the billions of dollars the city needs to pay for public transit and more affordable housing. Here's what you need to know about the hike:

The change will see property taxes rise by one per cent in 2020 and 2021, and an additional 1.5 per cent annually until 2025.

That means an average homeowner can expect to pay about $45 more per year next year.

By 2025, city officials say the average household will contribute $326 per year to the city building fund, in addition to other taxes.

Here's how the vote went down, via our city hall reporter Lauren Pelley.

This likely won't be the only fee going up in 2020.

The city is also expected to hike the rates for water and garbage removal. 

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

Become a CBC Member

Join the conversationCreate account

Already have an account?

now