Toronto

Sneaky Dee's likely to be demolished to make way for condo building

Local Toronto bar Sneaky Dee's could be torn down after the city announced it has received a proposal for a 13-storey building in its place.

Sneaky Dee's is both a restaurant and 200+ capacity concert venue

The City of Toronto released a proposal that suggest local Toronto bar Sneaky Dee's could be demolished and turned into a condo. ((CBC))

Local Toronto bar Sneaky Dee's could be torn down after the city announced it has received a proposal for a 13-storey building in its place.

The proposal, which was submitted Sept. 4, calls for a mixed-use building that would cover the current residents of 419, 421, 423, 429, and 431 on College Street. It would also consist of a total of 169 units and more than 13,000 square metres of "combined residential and non-residential gross floor area."

Some Torontonians took to Twitter to express their unhappiness about the proposal, and a petition has been started calling for it to be rejected.

Sneaky Dee's, which is located at 431 College St. on the corner of College and Bathurst Streets, began as a family business in 1987 and is now both a restaurant and 200+ capacity concert venue. 

'This is a pretty iconic site,' councillor says

Toronto city councillor Mike Layton says while no decision has been taken by the council, it would be sad to see Sneaky Dee's go.

"It's an era and a space in Toronto that we're running out of," Layton told CBC News.

"This is, I think, one of those questions of who are we building the city for? Do we still want to have spaces like that where culture and people of various backgrounds can intermingle and enjoy a space in our city?

"I'm hopeful that we'll be able to find a path forward that will allow us to keep a space like Sneaky Dees in our community. This is a pretty iconic site and it would really be sad to see them go," Layton added.

Toronto Mayor John Tory also expressed his concern about the potential loss of another music venue.

"We know the importance of music venues in our city — that's why we have taken action to help provide property tax relief for these sites to help them remain viable," he said in an email to CBC Toronto Monday. 

Tory says planning officials have yet to review the proposal, but he will work with Layton to ensure the best interests of the community are served, something he says "goes well beyond any single development." 

"Hearing from the community is an important part of the planning process and I want to assure people that both Councillor Layton and myself will be listening to their feedback," said Tory.

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