Pair taking selfies on Scarborough Bluffs call mom before being rescued

A young man and woman have been charged with a bylaw offence after they tried to climb the Scarborough Bluffs on Sunday, took photos, got stuck near the top and had to be rescued by Toronto firefighters.

Toronto police say the adult brother and sister called their mom when they got stuck

A man and woman in their 20s have been charged with a bylaw offence after they tried to climb the Bluffs on Sunday, took photos, got stuck near the top and had to be rescued by Toronto firefighters. (CBC)

A young man and woman have been charged with a bylaw offence after they tried to climb the Scarborough Bluffs on Sunday, took photos, and got stuck near the top and had to be rescued by Toronto firefighters.

No one was injured but Toronto police and fire services say the rescue of the two siblings involved many emergency officials.

Police said the man, 21, and the woman, 20, called their mother when they got stranded and she called 911 around 6:55 p.m. The two climbed the Bluffs from the beach area. Their mother was on the beach with her husband when she called for help.

Firefighters rescued the pair by rope and lowered them to the bottom of the Bluffs using harnesses. The two were charged with the bylaw offence of climbing in an area of the park where it is prohibited.

Capt. Michael Westwood, spokesperson for Toronto Fire Services, said five fire trucks and 20 firefighters responded to the call. Firefighters brought the siblings down to the bottom of the Bluffs at 8:23 p.m.

"People should pay attention to and obey the rules there. There is signage up in along the Bluffs, and not to go scaling on the Bluffs for selfies," Westwood said.

"It's quite common that firefighters and police and paramedics are putting a lot of resources into rescues and it doesn't need to be if people and their pets stay away from the Bluffs because it is dangerous. It's very steep."

"In this case, they were lucky there were no injuries, but in the past there have been not so fortunate situations," he said.

Westwood said a rope rescue is not without risks. 

"Absolutely, it's dangerous for the rescuers, but more so for those who get stranded because they don't have any ropes protecting them."

Climbing called 'poor choice'

Staff Sgt. Dave Zebeski, of Toronto Police Service's 41 Division said climbing in the area is not allowed and not a good idea, especially at night, because there are no stairs, rails or safeguards.

"We've had a lot of rain, and of course, there's going to be a lot of loose gravel," he said.

"These were people who made a really poor choice and they were rescued and a lot of resources were used but no one was harmed or hurt during this."

Const. Allyson Douglas-Cook, spokesperson for the Toronto police, said callers told police that the two were taking photos, including selfies, while on the Bluffs.

Toronto Fire tweeted about the incident on Sunday night.