Hundreds in Toronto protest U.S. administration's family separation policy

​A few hundred people have gathered in front of the U.S. consulate in downtown Toronto to protest the Trump administration's immigration policy, and have brought stuffed animals to represent migrant children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Protest is 1 of several in Canada under Families Belong Together banner

Hundreds have gathered in front of the U.S. consulate in downtown Toronto to protest the Trump administration's immigration policy and have brought stuffed animals to represent migrant children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border. (Lorenda Reddekopp/CBC)

A few hundred people have gathered in front of the U.S. consulate in downtown Toronto to protest the Trump administration's immigration policy, and have brought stuffed animals to represent migrant children separated from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border.

Saturday's rally is one of more than a dozen in Canada. Other cities planning protests include Halifax, Ottawa, Winnipeg, Vancouver and Edmonton. More than 600 marches are planned in the U.S.

The growing pile of stuffed toys in Toronto includes a cage with two dolls inside to symbolize children being detained under the controversial U.S. policy.

Many of the protesters in front of 360 University Ave., north of Queen Street West, have brought their children. Some U.S. citizens have joined the protest. All are rallying under the banner: Families Belong Together. 
The growing pile of stuffed toys includes a cage with two dolls inside to show that children are being detained under the U.S. policy. (Lorenda Reddekopp/CBC)

A number of speakers have denounced the immigration detention policy and are demanding an end to the separation of migrant children from their parents in the U.S.

U.S. President Donald Trump has ordered an end to the policy, but there are still more than 2,000 children in the custody of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

Organizers say the policy is abusive and a human rights violation.

Protest in support of 'children who don't have a voice'

"Something needs to be done immediately about the abusive segregation of asylum seeking families and their children on the United States, Mexico border. Taking children away from their parents and placing them in such conditions is evil and will have long term psychological, emotional and physical impact," says a Facebook post about Toronto's event.

"This is a human rights violation and the United States needs to be held accountable for its horrendous actions."

The post urges the Canadian government to take a stand on the issue.

"Canada needs to speak out and make a clear statement that such egregious human rights violations will not be tolerated," the Facebook post reads.

"We are coming together on behalf of the children who don't have a voice." 

The pile of stuffed animals, symbolizing children who don't have a voice, is growing in front of the U.S. consulate in downtown Toronto. (Lorenda Reddekopp/CBC)