A restaurant that pops up in your condo, for a night

If you want to go out for a nice dinner, you could make a reservation at a neighbourhood restaurant, or you could try the party room of one of downtown Toronto's many condominiums.

'There are restaurants, there's catering, and then there is home cooking'

If you want to go out for a nice dinner, you could make a reservation at a neighbourhood restaurant, or you could try the party room of one of downtown Toronto's many condominiums.

Cindy Fung hosts prix-fixe supper clubs and brunches there, as well as other secret locations around the city.

Her revolving restaurant, called the Pop-Up Supper Club, sets up in spaces like condo common rooms, apartments and event spaces, and serves as many as 16 people. She's currently trying to serve in a butcher shop, art gallery and, someday, even the woods.

"There are restaurants, there's catering, and then there is home cooking'," said the self-taught chef, who has both restaurant and catering experience.

She said it's like opening a new restaurant every time.

"They like the food more because they don't know what they're expecting," she said.

Fung told Metro Morning there's creativity that only cooking at a home kitchen offers. Her supper club is like a mixture of a night out at a restaurant, the informality of catering and the creativity of home cooking. But it is neither.

"It's like a supper club," she said. "People have the mind set to seek out these unique experiences."

Some dishes Fung said get attention is a duck egg wrapped in rice ravioli. She said it's like "egg porn."

Her next events are seven course meals every Saturday in March.

Walk into a condo party room, sit down with 15 strangers, and dine on a fancy, 10-course meal. Listen as we speak with Cindy Fung, the creator of a pop-up supper club. 5:22

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