Police seek alleged victims of man arrested in porn sweep

Toronto police allege a man charged in a massive child pornography sweep across Ontario abused numerous young girls.

Toronto police allege a man charged in a massive child pornography sweep across Ontario abused numerous young girls.

Det. Joel Manherz alleges the 42-year-old man "demanded and, at other times, begged" a young girl to send him compromising pictures or perform sexual acts on webcam.

Manherz says numerous child pornography images were seized and investigators believe there were many victims going back at least to 2006.

Shiraz Nariman, 42, faces charges of luring a child, invitation to sexual touching and making child pornography. (Toronto Police Service)

Police say the images came from underage girls the accused chatted with on the social networking sites Nexopia.com, Facebook and MSN Messenger.

Shiraz Nariman, 42, faces charges of luring a child under 16 and invitation to sexual touching, as well as accessing, possessing and making child pornography. 

Police said there is evidence the man may have met with some of the young girls.

Online he used the user names and email addresses sirazb@hotmail.comshiraz900@hotmail.com, sirazb, alex_isme and a1.sirop, police said.

Police said Nariman also used an image of a young man who they believe lives in the Toronto area to represent him. Police released two images of that man and stressed he did nothing wrong.

Tips for parents

  • Stay connected with what your child is doing online.
  • Have regular conversations about the risks of technology. Make sure they understand how easy it is to lose control of images and video once shared, and the importance of being good custodians of their friends' information.
  • Discuss boundaries. Explain that adults who engage in sexual or sexually nuanced conversations are not safe.

Source: Canadian Centre for Child Protection

Manherz said Nariman was allegedly able to convince some girls they were in love with him.

"Some talked about moving in with him or even marrying him," he said.

Nonie Classen, director of education for the Canadian Centre for Child Protection, told CBC News that's an easy trap for adolescents to fall into.

"They are looking to deepen relationships, they do want to experiment, and they're sexually curious, so they're really vulnerable to this," she said. 

Manherz warned young people they can never be certain about somebody's online identity if you haven't met them in person. "It doesn't matter how long you've talked to them or how intimate you've been with your feelings," he said. "You don't know who they are."

With files from CBC News