Toronto Photos

Class of 2022: In-person convocation back at U of T after pandemic hiatus

Graduates from the University of Toronto are taking part in convocation ceremonies this month — the first in-person convocations since 2019 when gatherings where restricted due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Over 15,000 graduates are slated to cross stage of university's Convocation Hall in June

Graduates line up outside the University of Toronto's Convocation Hall for their convocation ceremony on June 9. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Like others on campuses across Canada, graduating students at the University of Toronto are taking part in convocation ceremonies this month — the first in-person ceremonies for the school since the COVID-19 pandemic began. 

More than 15,500 people are scheduled to cross the stage during 32 ceremonies being held between June 2-24. CBC photographer Evan Mitsui was there to document the happy occasion this week.

Outside Convocation Hall

Members of the chancellor's procession, including chancellor Rose Patten and U of T Scarborough vice-president Wisdom Tettey, head into Convocation Hall.

For the first time in U of T's history, convocation ceremonies include an Eagle Feather Bearer, who on this day is Juanita Muise. The eagle feather is a symbol of the school's commitment toward reconciliation with Indigenous people, university president Meric Gertler said. 

Students line up to enter the hall for their ceremony.

Inside the hall

During the afternoon ceremony, these undergraduate students sit and wait for their big moment to cross the stage and receive their Honours Bachelor of Arts and Bachelor of Arts degrees.

This group of students is getting ready to go on stage.

After the ceremony

Alaina Luk, 28, poses for a photo with her bouquet of flowers after the graduation ceremony.

Niya Hussen takes a selfie outside Convocation Hall.

Joey Chan, 21, is pictured with her bouquet and a big smile.

Proud family and friends

Graduates take photos with their loved ones to mark one of life's biggest achievements.

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