Toronto

Ontario records fewer than 100 new COVID-19 cases for 4th consecutive day

Currently, the province sits at 39,714 reported cases in total since the pandemic began in January of this year. However, the number of active cases continues to decline, with 159 more resolved today. 

Province sees 95 new cases after completing another 26,000 tests

Ontario records fourth consecutive day of less than 100 cases with 95 new COVID-19 infections reported Thursday. (Nathan Denette/The Canadian Press)

Ontario recorded 95 new COVID-19 cases today bringing the province to its fourth consecutive day of having less than 100 cases. 

Currently, the province sits at 39,714 reported cases in total since the pandemic began in January of this year. However, the number of active cases continues to decline, with 159 more resolved today. In total, about 90 per cent of those infected with COVID-19 have recovered in Ontario. 

After processing more than 26,000 tests, Health Minister Christine Elliott said 29 of the province's 34 health units have reported five or fewer cases. Of those, 15 had zero new cases.

Ontario's Chief Public Health officer Dr. David Williams says he hopes the daily number of positive COVID-19 cases will continue to drop.

"I want to see our numbers under 50," said Williams. "[We] might even be there next week."

Almost all of Ontario is now in Stage 3 of the province's COVID-19 economic reopening plan, with the exception of Windsor-Essex, which had seen high case numbers largely due to community spread within the farming industry.

Today, that region reported only five new COVID-19 cases, making it the second consecutive day of low numbers. 

Government to spend $6M more on community safety

The province also announced a $6 million for frontline community safety initiatives over the course of three years, some of which will go directly to police forces.

The new measures are intended to combat drug trafficking and gang violence, and to protect women and children. 

"These horrific crimes can create long lasting trauma and it is vital we provide support," said Jill Dunlop, Associate Minister of Children and Women's Issues.

The money for these projects comes from assets seized from criminal prosecutions, Dunlop said. 

Ontario has seen significant violence in the province, including gang activity in the tow-truck industry and a series of shootings.

"Everyone is looking to resume a little more of a normal life," said Premier Doug Ford. "But they can't do that if they don't feel safe."

And he had a message for criminals: "We're coming after you and we'll throw the book at you." 

With files from Ania Bessonov

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