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New Ontario PC logo surprises with addition of red, green

Once dubbed the Big Blue Machine, the Ontario PC party is hoping a revamped logo that features both red and green will give it a boost in the polls.

Graphic design expert rips logo, calling it 'amateurish'

Ontario PC Leader Patrick Brown is hoping a new logo will help his party's chances in the 2018 election. (Fred Chartrand/The Canadian Press)

Once dubbed the Big Blue Machine, the Ontario PC party is hoping a revamped logo that features both red and green will give it a boost in the polls.

Patrick Brown unveiled the new logo — a red P merging with a blue C with a stylized green trillium in the middle — at the party's convention last weekend in Ottawa. The inclusion of Liberal red was the biggest surprise to those who follow Queen's Park.

"Our signs are still going to be blue," Brown told reporters with a smile on Monday.

The Ontario PCs showed off the new logo at the party convention in Ottawa last weekend. (Ontario PC party/Twitter)
"It's policy that counts, not simply logos or branding."

Brown did, however, use his keynote speech to tell the some 1,600 convention delegates that the party must change if it wants to form government in 2018. His first step, he said, will be launching a series of consultations across the province to look for the best ideas for his party.

Brown also announced his support for a carbon tax in Ontario — though set up differently than the Liberal plan that's set to net the province some $1.9 billion per year.

Logo blasted as 'amateurish'

PC strategists, meanwhile, will be putting the logo front and centre during the next provincial election, which will see the party try to win every riding instead of just focusing on traditional strongholds as they did in 2014.

The logo, which was met with mixed reaction online, was blasted as "amateurish" by an expert at OCAD University.

"I don't think any of my students would pass my class if they showed me that logo," said David Thorne, a professor in the graphic design department.

However some OCAD University students said they liked the design and suggested it may appeal to a younger set.

What do you think of the design? Let us know in the comments below.

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