Toronto

Ontario asks judge to review new rules around police carding

An Ontario judge who recently led a review into police oversight will look into whether the practice of police street checks, known as carding, is consistent with the provincial government's goal of eliminating systemic racism.

Liberal government has appointed judge to review the implementation of new street check regulation

Appeal Court Justice Michael Tulloch will conduct a review of how a new street check regulation has been implemented. (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)

An Ontario judge who recently led a review into police oversight will look into whether the practice of police street checks, known as carding, is consistent with the provincial government's goal of eliminating systemic racism.

The Liberal government has appointed Appeal Court Justice Michael Tulloch to conduct a review of how a new street check regulation has been implemented.

Ontario introduced carding rules last year, outlining that police must inform people that they don't have to provide identifying information during street checks.

The aim was to end arbitrary stops, especially those based on race, though anti-carding advocates have called for the practice to be abolished entirely.

Tulloch will report by Jan. 1, 2019, on whether the continued use of carding reflects the government's plan to eliminate systemic racism.

He will make recommendations on how consistently the rules are applied, compliance by police officers, oversight mechanisms of the regulation and if additional changes are necessary.

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