Nightmare on Elm St.

David Correa was cycling home from work earlier this week when he found himself sprawled across Elm Street, cut, bruised and badly shaken up.

David Correa was cycling home from work earlier this week when he found himself sprawled across Elm Street, cut, bruised and badly shaken up.

He had hit an unmarked trench that construction crews had sliced into the roadway.

"I flew over [the handlebars].  Cars stopped because I hit pretty hard," said Correa.

The cyclist was turning off University Avenue on to Elm Street when his front wheel went into the slice.

The trench runs about half of a city block - and it's just the right size to catch a bicycle tire.

Correa's front tire went into the trench and he went flying. 

"I was bleeding, my hand was bleeding, [I] hit my shoulder, luckily I had my helmet [on]," said Correa.

When he got up he found his front tire stuck in the trench and his bicycle broken. 

Correa dragged himself to a nearby hospital where he was treated for bad scrapes and bruises

He's still waiting for the results of the X-rays on his wrist.

Although he's not badly hurt, he's angry.

He missed a day of work and lost a day's pay.  His bike was wrecked.

"I had to spend the [next] morning trying to fix my bike, get a new wheel ... I couldn't really walk very well."

He's says there was no sign, no detour, no warning.

"There [was] no way of knowing.  I have never seen this done in the city and I've never seen this level of lack of care for people riding.  I was not expecting to have a 12-inch deep crack in the middle of nowhere, without any signs," he told CBC News.

Correa  called the city and sent an email asking for an explanation.  Warning signs went up later in the day but the trench remained.

Late Friday afternoon - nearly 48-hours after Correa's accident and more than a day after he called and emailed, the city said it was looking after the problem. 

A communications company was responsible for the trench, said a spokesman for the city. 

"They did have a permit. We have followed up with them and in fact we have them coming back within the next hour or so to refill the trench that is there now," said Angie Antonio, the director of Transportation Services.