Toronto

Police Chief Mark Saunders back on the job after kidney transplant

Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders is back on the job Monday after recuperating from a kidney transplant that came from his wife, Stacey.

Chief had spent more than two months recovering from transplant from wife Stacey

Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders, who became chief in 2015, is back on the job Monday after taking two months off to recover from a kidney transplant. (Darren Calabrese/Canadian Press)

Toronto Police Chief Mark Saunders is back on the job Monday after recuperating from a kidney transplant that came from his wife, Stacey.

Sgt. Darla Tannahill tweeted out welcome on Sunday, thanking Stacey Saunders for her donation and crediting the "miracle of medical science." 

Before the surgery, Saunders had only one kidney — which was failing — and had been living with kidney disease since the 1990s. 

He told CTV in September he underwent seven hours of life-saving dialysis every night.

Kidney disease, also called chronic kidney failure, is the gradual loss of kidney function, which can progress to end-stage kidney failure — a fatal situation without dialysis or a transplant, according to the Mayo Clinic.

In late September, CBC confirmed that his wife would be a living kidney donor.

Following the successful transfer, Saunders issued a release thanking the public for their "encouraging words." 

During Saunders' recovery period, Deputy Chief James Ramer, who had been handling Specialized Operations Command and has been a member of the Toronto Police Service since 1980, was acting chief.