Toronto

'I just wish they could catch them': Tire slashings in Leslieville stump residents

Toronto police are investigating a rash of tire slashings in Leslieville, targeting cars parked on the street. Residents there have been finding their wheels punctured but don't know who is behind it.

Police investigating, reviewing home security camera footage

Toronto police are investigating a rash of tire slashings in Leslieville, targeting cars parked on the street. Jonathan Antoine thinks his family car had its tire slashed overnight Sunday. (Ed Middleton/CBC)

Toronto police are investigating a rash of tire slashings in Leslieville, targeting cars parked on the street. Residents there have been finding their wheels punctured but don't know who is behind it.

"I think it's CAA time," said David Jackson, who lives on Curzon Street. He found the rear tire of his BMW slashed Monday morning.

At least three other cars parked along the street were hit over the weekend, including Rick Marshall's.

"I thought hopefully it's only a nail," said Marshall, when his truck's dashboard alerted him to the flat. "Much to my chagrin, it was a hole in the side wall."

David Jackson spent some of his morning trying to pump air back into the tire he thought had just gone flat. He quickly realized the air was seeping out of a small puncture in the side. (Ed Middleton/CBC)

Knowing he wasn't going to be able to patch the hole for cheap, he took it to the shop.

"I just got back from my dealer and they want $300 to change my tire which is too much money."

Let's just say I'd like to break a few legs.- Rick Marshall, Leslieville resident

Instead, he'll opt for finding a used tire to replace the one he has now. 

"I've got a brand new tire with less than 14,000 kilometres on it that now is garbage, now going to the landfill, thanks to who knows," he said.

"Let's just say I'd like to break a few legs." 

'Malicious vandalism'

Jonathan Antoine, who lives a few streets over on Winnifred Avenue, stepped out Monday morning to find his family car leaning funnily toward the sidewalk.

"I have to wake my mom up and let her know, she's not going to be happy," he said, shaking his head.

People on several streets in Leslieville have reported their tires getting slashed overnight on weekends. (Ed Middleton/CBC)

All the air was let out of the front tire through a centimetre long gash, similar to the slashings seen along Curzon Street.

Antoine's parents were using the car during the day on Sunday so he suspects it happened overnight — and he's not alone. As of Monday morning, CBC Toronto counted three more cars on Winnifred Avenue with slashed tires.

It happened to Kelly Manis two weeks ago and a full tire replacement cost her $250. (Ed Middleton/CBC)

Kelly Manis had her tires slashed two weeks ago. She said it's happening all over Leslieville. 

"I'm upset, it cost me $250 to replace it," she said. "It's just like, malicious vandalism. I just wish they could catch them."

Same area hit by slashing spree in March

The area has been on police radar since late March when another slashing spree happened on the same streets. 

Shelly Musaev said a policeman knocked on her door two weeks ago and asked if they could see footage from the security camera out front of her house.

All of the tires have small punctures in the sides of the tires rendering them impossible to plug and a full replacement is often needed, running people hundreds of dollars. (Ed Middleton)

"Three tires were slashed that one day," she said. "So he was pretty concerned."

Police say residents should report these incidents through their Citizen Online Report Entry site, used to document property and vehicle damage, among others things.

They said only one person in Leslieville used the site over the weekend to report the slashings.

About the Author

Ali Chiasson

Reporter, CBC Toronto

From teleprompter to Associate Producer, Ali Chiasson worked many desks at CBC News Network before stepping in front of the cameras at CBC Toronto. Ali covers a wide range of breaking and feature stories and has a special knack for people profiles. Off the clock, Ali is happiest walking through Bloordale with headphones on, picking through local produce markets, sipping bubble tea and snapping pics of street art.