Toronto

Johnathan 'didn't deserve' brutal killing, teen tells court

A sentencing hearing for two teens convicted in the brutal murder of the young boy "Johnathan" wrapped up Monday with a tearful apology by the 18-year-old to the boy's mother.

A sentencing hearing for two teens convicted in the brutal murder of the young boy "Johnathan" wrapped up Monday with a tearful apology by the 18-year-old to the boy's mother.

The 18-year-old, who was convicted of manslaughter for his part in what the judge called a vicious slaughter of an innocent child, told the court the boy did not deserve to die.

"Although I only met Johnathan once or twice, I could tell he was a very sweet young boy and he didn't deserve what happened to him," he told the court, sobbing.

The teen was one of two convicted of the gruesome murder of a 12-year-old boy— who can only be identified as "Johnathan"— after the boy was beaten with baseball bats, stabbed 71 times and had his throat slashed in November 2003.

The two were charged when under the age of 18 and cannot be identified under terms of the federal Youth Criminal Justice Act.

Brother refuses to speak

The 19-year-old brother of Johnathan, who was found guilty in February of first-degree murder in the killing, declined a chance to speak to the court.

The brother was also convicted of attempted murder for attacking his stepfather when he arrived at the east-end Toronto home.

Crown attorney Hank Goody told the Superior Courtthat thebrother is still a threat to society and should be sentenced as an adult.

He said that a youth sentence with a maximum of six years in prison is not long enough for the 19-year-old killer to be rehabilitated so he won't pose a threat to the public.

It's also not long enough to hold him accountable for what he's done, Goody added.

Still feels no remorse

During the sentencing hearing, Goody posed a question to the court: What kind of person decides to kill his younger brother with a large butcher knife, except for a deeply disturbed individual?

He asked Judge David McCombs to sentence the teen as an adult, arguing that life imprisonment with no chance of parole for at least seven years will provide enough time for the teen to be treated and then safely reintegrated into society.

A court-appointed psychiatrist testified earlier in the sentencing hearing that Johnathan's killer is a psychopath who is emotionally detached and still feels no remorse for his actions.

McCombs said he expects to pass sentence on Friday. He must decide whether to sentence the two as adults or youths.