Toronto

Doug Ford won't say if he will march in Toronto Pride parade

The Tory leader has made controversial remarks about the Pride Parade before, describing it in 2014 as an event where "middle-aged men with pot bellies" ran down the street "buck naked."

Ford said his focus is on other issues until after the election

PC Leader Doug Ford campaign in Sault Ste. Marie on Friday, where his candidate is facing a tough race against an NDP challenger. (Frank Gunn/Canadian Press)

Doug Ford won't say whether he'll march in Toronto's annual Pride parade if he's elected Ontario premier.

The Progressive Conservative leader says he has not yet decided if he will attend and participate in the event if he wins the June 7 vote.

"When I get elected we'll sit down and we'll make that decision," he said at a campaign stop in Sault Ste Marie, Ont., on Friday.

"My main focus is the economy, is making sure we create jobs and have this province thrive. I am zoned in on that."

The Tory leader has made controversial remarks about the Pride Parade before, describing it in 2014 as an event where "middle-aged men with pot bellies" ran down the street "buck naked."

Ford's brother, the late former Toronto mayor Rob Ford, courted controversy by not attending the Pride Parade, saying the event conflicted with a scheduled family weekend at the cottage.

Doug Ford stressed he has not made up his mind on attending the colourful summer event.

"Reducing taxes, reducing hydro rates, putting money back into the people's pocket. That's my main focus for the next six days," he said.

Former Progressive Conservative leader Patrick Brown became the first Tory leader to head an official delegation in the parade in 2015.

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