Toronto

'I thought we did everything right': Why a bar owner was forced to pay for customer's false fire alarm

Refusing to serve a few intoxicated patrons is now costing bar owner Kristine Lukanchoff nearly $1,500, because she says those rowdy visitors pulled the fire alarm, causing the city to slap her with a faulty fire alarm bill. 

Workers tried to stop firefighters from coming after angry customer pulled alarm

Crews arrived at The Old Nick on Nov. 10, 2019, at 1:25 a.m. for a fire alarm. (Facebook/Old Nick Pub )

Refusing to serve a few intoxicated patrons is now costing bar owner Kristine Lukanchoff nearly $1,500 because she says those rowdy visitors pulled the fire alarm, causing the city to slap her with a faulty fire alarm bill. 

The incident happened last November when Lukanchoff says her staff at The Old Nick on Danforth Avenue asked some men to leave. 

"One of the guys started flipping out and swearing and causing a big scene," said Lukanchoff. "He went outside and started smashing the window and then came back in, pulled the fire alarm and ran away." 

Immediately, Lukanchoff says servers called 911 to let them know the alarm was false, but the operator didn't call off the crews. 

Calling police could have waived the bill 

Toronto Fire Services spokesperson Stephan Powell, says crews respond to all incidents whether requests are cancelled or not, adding in an email to CBC Toronto that "it is not possible to remotely determine whether the incident is a nuisance/malicious false alarm, or a real emergency."

That night, Lukanchoff says only one truck arrived at the bar but the bill she got on Jan. 7 was for three — $477 per vehicle. She says the city told her it sent out three trucks and when the first discovered it was a false alarm, the other two were turned around.

Kristine Lukanchoff owns The Old Nick and says before last November there had never been a false fire alarm there in 17 years. ( Kristine Lukanchoff)
 

However, if Lukanchoff had called police to report that the alarm was pulled by angry patrons, she likely wouldn't have had to pay the fee, since it would have been considered vandalism. 

"It's really frustrating," said Lukanchoff. "I would have preferred a warning." 

Bars and homeowners used to get warnings 

Ten years ago, people were given initial warnings and weren't charged if it was the first time crews arrived at a false alarm at a particular location.

But false calls are costly to the city, so the bylaw was changed. Now when firefighters are dispatched to a false alarm, home and business owners are hit with the bill, up to a maximum of $1,431 — the cost of three trucks. 

Powell says the fee can be disputed by emailing the city. But Lukanchoff says she tried that and her claim was rejected.

"I've been here 17 years and this never happened … I thought we did everything right." 

About the Author

Natalie Nanowski

Reporter, CBC Toronto

Natalie is a storyteller who spent the last few years in Montreal covering everything from politics to corruption and student protests. Now that she’s back in her hometown of Toronto, she is eagerly rediscovering what makes this city tick, and has a personal interest in real estate and investigative journalism. When she’s not reporting you can find her at a yoga studio or exploring Queen St. Contact Natalie: natalie.nanowski@cbc.ca

Comments

To encourage thoughtful and respectful conversations, first and last names will appear with each submission to CBC/Radio-Canada's online communities (except in children and youth-oriented communities). Pseudonyms will no longer be permitted.

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.

undefined