Toronto

Facelift in the works for Toronto's busiest transit corridor

One of Toronto's most iconic streets is up for a remake, with the city launching a study Thursday about what King Street — Toronto's busiest surface transit route — should look like in the months and years ahead.

King Street's future the focus of new study that launches today

Toronto's chief planner, Jennifer Keesmaat, says the city's planning department is overseeing a re-design of King Street and other key corridors in the downtown area. (CBC News)

One of Toronto's most iconic streets is up for a remake, with the city launching a study Thursday about what King Street — Toronto's busiest surface transit route — should look like in the months and years ahead.

The study will look at King Street from the perspective of pedestrians, businesses and commuters. 

"With job and housing growth continuing along the corridor, the time is now to rethink how King functions," The city's chief planner, Jennifer Keesmaat said in a statement Thursday. "This study will look at optimizing transit, better pedestrian and retail experiences and improving public spaces."

Kicking off the study is a panel discussion Thursday night sponsored by the city and the Pembina Institute at the University of Toronto's Innis Town Hall. It starts at 6 p.m. ET.

Ultimately, the study's findings will be used in a pilot project to re-design King, scheduled for mid-2017.

It's part of a wider project the city is undertaking called TOCore, that's looking into ways in which the downtown core can grow in the years ahead.

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