Toronto

CUPE, University of Toronto reach new tentative deal

The University of Toronto and CUPE 3902 have reached a new tentative agreement, the first since teaching assistants and other non-tenured staff represented by the union walked off the job two weeks ago.

Students walk out, demand partial tuition refund

CUPE represents about 4,000 non-tenured academic staff at U of T and another 6,000 at York University, who are also on strike. (Michael Charles Cole)

The University of Toronto and CUPE 3902 have reached a new tentative agreement, the first since teaching assistants and other non-tenured staff represented by the union walked off the job two weeks ago. 

The deal will be presented to members at a ratification meeting on Friday, according to a spokesperson for CUPE 3902 Unit 1. 

The union said the strike will continue in the meantime, with pickets remaining up on campus. 

Cheryl Regehr, the university's vice-president and provost, said in a statement UofT officials are "very pleased" to have reached the tentative agreement. 

The strike at U of T was triggered when CUPE 3902 rejected a previous tentative deal late last month. 

CUPE represents about 4,000 non-tenured academic staff at U of T and another 6,000 at York University, who are also on strike. 

Students walk out 

U of T students began to walk out of their classes Wednesday, demanding a partial tuition refund while showing support for striking teaching assistants.

Students walked out of classes at U of T's St. George campus to show solidarity with striking teaching assistants and other non-tenured staff on Wednesday. (Linda Ward/CBC)
Undergrads at U of T's St. George, Mississauga and Scarborough campuses began to walk just after noon. About 3,000 students intended to participate in today's action, according to the students' union Facebook page.

Classes have not been cancelled during the strike but some students say their education is being compromised.

"We're being told constantly that it's business as usual, and clearly it's not," student Liam Fox told CBC News. "Students are having courses cancelled, tutorials cancelled. They have no idea what's happening with their unmarked assignments, they have no idea when exams are going to happen.

"In a lot of cases, students don't know if they're going to graduate this year."

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