Toronto

Comparing COVID-19 numbers in Peel Region and Toronto

Peel's public health head is warning there is still community transmission of the novel coronavirus and that the region needs to proceed cautiously while reopening. Here's how case counts there compare with those in the City of Toronto.

'We haven’t yet seen a steady decline in daily new cases,' Peel's top doctor says

Some retail stores in Toronto reopened this week and the city's now opening more public spaces, but health officials in Peel Region are warning they're still seeing worrying levels of community transmission there. (Evan Mitsui/CBC)

Peel's public health head is warning there is still community transmission of the novel coronavirus and that the region needs to proceed cautiously while reopening.

"We haven't yet seen a steady decline in daily new cases," Lawrence Loh, Peel's interim medical officer of health, told CBC Radio's Metro Morning on Thursday.

Here's a look at how Peel's COVID-19 case count compares with the City of Toronto's.

Peel Region — population of about 1.5 million

Peel's breakdown shows Mississauga has the most confirmed COVID-19 cases, though Brampton has nearly the same number. Caledon, meanwhile, has just under three per cent of the area's confirmed cases.

  • 3,760 total cases — 2,708 recovered.
  • 5 per cent of those infected have been hospitalized.
  • 231 deaths.
  • 31 institutions have reported outbreaks.

You can find more data here

City of Toronto — population of around 2.9 million

Toronto's public health officials have not highlighted any specific neighbourhoods that have been hit harder than others, but have released early data showing some people are more at risk than others.

  • 9,357 cases — 6,885 recovered.
  • 4 per cent hospitalized — a drop of 11 per cent from Wednesday. 
  • 732 deaths.
  • 137 institutions have reported outbreaks.

The Ontario government, meanwhile, released its latest COVID-19 data Thursday morning, reporting 413 new cases since its last update on Wednesday. The province is also facing fresh questions about the level of testing it's conducting, and whether or not it should begin randomly testing people for the novel coronavirus.

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