Capybara goes on media tour after friends escape High Park Zoo

As staff at the High Park Zoo scour the area for two escaped capybaras, staff at Hands On Exotics took the opportunity to organize a media tour for Willow, a female capybara they use to entertain children at birthday parties and other events.

It took 4 people to carry Willow's crate to newsrooms around the city Wednesday

Willow the capybara shows CBC anchor John Northcott a little love during a visit to the CBC newsroom on Wednesday.

When two capybaras went on the lam from the High Park Zoo Tuesday, many Toronto residents probably wondered: what, exactly, is a capybara?

So as staff at the zoo scour High Park and surrounding areas for the two large rodents, staff at Hands On Exotics took the opportunity to organize a media tour for Willow, a female capybara they use to entertain children at birthday parties and other events.

Willow stopped by the CBC's Toronto offices with her handler, Seth, but it wasn't easy. It took four people to carry Willow, who weighs 100 pounds, to a studio.

Willow made stops at other Toronto newsrooms on Wednesday morning, taking a break from her efforts to search for her furry friends.

She made friends over at 299 Queen St. W.

And she appeared on local radio.

Willow also added her two cents to the story meeting at the Toronto Star.

Before making her prediction for tonight's Raptors/Cavaliers game.

Finally, she put her feet up over at the Metro newsroom.

But she won't get to rest for long. Willow is not only helping search for the two missing rodents. She is also single and ready to mingle, according to Seth.

"Willow is single and her Tinder hasn't been very busy lately," Seth told CBC News.

If Seth is hoping for a hookup for his young charge, he may not want to add his line about how she loves "wallowing in the mud" to her online dating profiles.

This assessment may work better: "Just like a hippo, she's a ballerina underwater."

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