Nearly half of Ontario cannabis users polled have driven under the influence: CAA

A new study released by CAA South Central Ontario shows that among current users, almost one in two Ontarian drivers have driven under the influence of marijuana.

Those who drive under influence of cannabis were more likely to be male, between 25 and 34, survey finds

Almost one in two current cannabis users polled have driven under the influence, according to the CAA. (Shutterstock)

A new study released by CAA South Central Ontario shows that nearly half of the current cannabis users surveyed in Ontario say they have driven under the influence. 

The poll, which was conducted online by Ipsos in July, defines current cannabis users as people who have used the drug in the last three months. It surveyed 1,000 Ontarians over the age of 19 who own, lease or drive a vehicle and have a valid driver's licence.

The research released Thursday also found that 28 per cent of current cannabis users said they drove a car under the influence of both alcohol and cannabis in the last three months. 

"Those who have driven a car under the influence of cannabis and alcohol, tended to do so in social settings such as gatherings with family and friends and at bars/clubs/pubs," CAA said in a media release.  

Those who drive under the influence of cannabis were more likely to be male and between the ages of 25 and 34, the survey showed.

The CAA also noted that of the current cannabis users they polled, more than half said when driving under the influence they believe their performance on the road is worse than a sober driver. The poll also showed that those drivers have concerns that legalization may bring more cannabis-impaired drivers to the roads.

The "common perception" that people drive better under the influence of cannabis "is not necessarily the case," Elliott Silverstein, manager of government relations at CAA South Central Ontario, said in the release.

"Current cannabis users are also concerned about impairment and road safety," Silverstein explained. 


The CAA-commissioned statistically representative study was conducted online by Ipsos in July. It surveyed 1,000 Ontarians over the age of 19 who own, lease or drive a vehicle and have a valid driver's license. For comparison purposes only, a probability sample of the same size would yield a margin of error of three per cent.