Toronto

More than 2,000 gather in Toronto to remember victims of Baghdad bombings

More than 2,000 people gathered at Queen's Park in Toronto on Thursday evening to pay tribute to those killed in a massive truck bombing in Baghdad last Saturday.

Scarborough MP says acts of terror can divide communities but it's important to stay united

More than 2,000 people gathered at Queen's Park in Toronto Thursday evening to pay tribute to those killed in a massive truck bombing in Baghdad last Saturday. 1:21

More than 2,000 people gathered at Queen's Park in Toronto Thursday evening to pay tribute to those killed in a massive truck bombing in Baghdad last Saturday.

A handful of people, dressed in white T-shirts streaked with red paint, lay on the ground during the candlelight vigil.

"Iraqi lives matter," the crowd chanted at one point.

Thousands gathered at Queen's Park on Thursday night to honour the victims of last weekend's horrific truck bombing in Baghdad. Nearly 300 people were killed in the attack, carried out by ISIS. ( Tina Mackenzie/CBC)
Others held up posters that were collages of photos of those died in the weekend bombing.

Scarborough MP Salma Zahid told the crowd that they were gathered there to remember the victims of recent attacks and that the losses have cast a shadow over Eid.

"We are all here to show solidarity after the recent incidents that happened in the past few days in Iraq, Saudi Arabia, Bangladesh and Turkey," she said.

The crowd outside Queen's Park began chanting 'Iraqi lives matter' as some lay on the ground to pay tribute to those who died Saturday in Baghdad. ( Tina Mackenzie/CBC)
"These acts of terrorism tend to divide us, but what we have to do is stand united. As we celebrate Eid, we have to think about those people who have lost their lives in the recent incidents. Canada will work with its allies to fight against terrorism."
A woman gets comforted during the vigil. ( Tina Mackenzie/CBC)
Candles flickered on the ground during the vigil.

The Baghdad attack last Sunday, considered the deadliest attack in Iraq since the 2003 U.S.-led invasion, has left 292 people dead, according to the Iraqi government's health ministry media office, The Associated Press reported.

Many who attended the event said they were there to show that terrorism would not divide their community. (Tina Mackenzie/CBC)