Toronto

Boy, 13, charged with 1st-degree murder in death of Aaron Rankine-Wright

A 13-year-old Toronto boy has been charged with first-degree murder in connection with a "targeted" hit and run in Little Portugal last weekend that led to the death of cyclist Aaron Rankine-Wright.

A 17-year-old has already been charged and police are looking for 3rd suspect in Little Portugal hit and run

Aaron Rankine-Wright, 19, was killed in a deliberate hit and run and stabbing in Little Portugal on June 9, Toronto police say. Police have arrested two people in connection with his death and are looking for a third suspect. (Facebook)

A 13-year-old Toronto boy has been charged with first-degree murder in connection with a "targeted" hit and run in Little Portugal last weekend that led to the death of cyclist Aaron Rankine-Wright. 

A 17-year-old has already been charged in the case and police are hunting for a third suspect, believed to be in his teens or 20s. 

Rankine-Wright, 19, was struck by an SUV and then stabbed around 5:30 p.m. Saturday in a laneway behind a school at Frankish and Sheridan avenues, near Dundas Avenue and Dufferin Street. He was on his way to work, homicide Det. Sgt. Mike Carbone, the lead investigator, previously said at a news conference.

Carbone said the vehicle, a black Toyota RAV4, hit a tree after striking the cyclist. Its occupants, three males in dark sweatshirts and sweatpants, jumped out of the vehicle and repeatedly stabbed Rankine-Wright before fleeing on foot. 

The vehicle, a black Toyota RAV4, hit a tree after striking the cyclist. Three males jumped out of the vehicle and repeatedly stabbed Rankine-Wright before fleeing on foot. (Michael Charles Cole/CBC)

Police arrived to find the cyclist unconscious and not breathing, with witnesses performing CPR on him.

Rankine-Wright was taken to a trauma centre in life-threatening condition and later died. A post-mortem examination revealed that he died from a stab wound to the chest.

Investigators believe the trio "targeted" the victim.

Wrestler with bright future, coach says

It wasn't supposed to be this way, said one of Rankine-Wright's wrestling coaches, Neal Ewers.

Wrestling was perhaps "the most consistent thing" in Rankine-Wright's life, Ewers remembers the teen's mother telling him once. 

Ewers was eager to get Rankine-Wright thinking about a future that included university or college.

"A lot of us are really torn up," said Ewers. Rankine-Wright wasn't the first young man he'd mentored whose life has been cut short, he said.

But for anyone who might believe the teen was out looking for trouble, his coach said, "It's not in his character. If anyone is assuming that, that's not this kid. This kid is the nicest kid coming out of the circumstances that he came out of."