Toronto

Blue Jays fan seeks arrest in order to watch series finale

Blue Jays fever almost turned criminal in a way you probably wouldn't expect this morning and even Toronto police were taken aback.

'No, there are no TVs in the holding cells at police stations or at court,' police officer says

Blue Jays fans can watch the series finale against the Rangers on a big screen at Nathan Phillips Square. (John Rieti/CBC)

Blue Jays fever almost turned criminal in a way you probably wouldn't expect this morning and even Toronto police were taken aback.

On Wednesday, just after 8 a.m., police received a call from a man asking to go to jail so that he could watch the do-or-die baseball game this afternoon against the Texas Rangers.

Officers responded to the call, worried about what the man might do to get arrested. They arrived near the intersection of Earl Street and Howard Street, but couldn't locate the caller.

If this seems like a good way for fans to catch the game, Const. Jennifer Sidhu is about to burst your bubble.

"No, there are no TVs in the holding cells at police stations or at court," she told CBC News. "But I don't know whether detention centres have them." 

Sidhu said that if the man had been on scene and got arrested, he would have been taken to a police station for processing before going directly to court. So, by the time he would have arrived at a detention centre, he would have already missed the series finale.

York Regional Police seemed to have anticipated this kind of move last week. They tweeted about their television-less cells before Game 1 of the American League Division Series last Thursday.

We're not sure if the fan in question will end up watching the big game. But if he's reading this, there is a big screen playing the playoff showdown at Nathan Phillips Square, beginning at 4:07 p.m.

So there really is no need to get arrested.

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