Toronto

Delayed murder trial for man accused of Toronto van attack

The trial for a man who killed 10 people when he drove a van into crowds of pedestrians on a busy Toronto street will be delayed by three weeks.

New date set for March as Crown and defence await psychiatric assessment

Alek Minassian killed 10 people during a van attack on April 23, 2018. (Aaron Vincent Elkaim/The Canadian Press)

The trial for a man who killed 10 people when he drove a van into crowds of pedestrians on a busy Toronto street will be delayed by three weeks.

The murder trial for Alek Minassian, which was initially scheduled to begin on Feb. 10, will now start on March 2.

Both the Crown attorney and the defence say they have not obtained Minassian's psychiatric assessment from a Toronto hospital.

Minassian told police shortly after the attack that it was retribution for years of sexual rejection and ridicule by women.

He faces 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder in connection with the April 23, 2018 van attack.

The judge who will decide the trial has said the case will turn on Minassian's state of mind at the time of the attack, not whether he did it.

Defence lawyer Boris Bytensky told court there have also been issues with completing a forensic examination of his client's electronic devices.

Alek Minassian will go to trial on 10 counts of first-degree murder and 16 counts of attempted murder next year. (LinkedIn)

The Crown said detectives have been unable to access Minassian's computer and phone due to encryption.

Bytensky told court Minassian agreed Monday to provide his password to the Crown attorney.

Minassian will next appear in court on Jan. 16.

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