Topic: apocalypse then

Apocalypse Then

Like polio, the long-term impact of COVID will be measured in disability

Practically everyone, from public health officials to political pundits to social media commentators, has framed the threat of COVID-19 in terms of its mortality rate. But as cultural historian Ainsley Hawthorn writes, COVID is going to injure many more people than it kills.
Apocalypse Then

This isn't the first time a pandemic has made the rich even richer

Pandemics can stretch the average person's finances to the limit. Yet, as cultural historian Ainsley Hawthorn writes, there are always those who profit from disaster.
Apocalypse Then

The century-long debate over vaccine passports

More than a century ago, two countries had two very different responses to the introduction of vaccine passports, writes conrtibutor Ainsley Hawthorn.
Apocalypse Then

A century ago, there was a race against time to fight a deadly outbreak

During the COVID-19 pandemic, Canada has benefitted from efficient, modern shipping methods to import vaccine doses from abroad. As Ainsley Hawthorn explains in her latest Apocalypse Then column, transporting medicine during previous disease outbreaks was a challenge that required remarkable effort.
Apocalypse Then

Today's vaccines are the result of centuries of experimentation

Modern vaccines seem like the epitome of scientific achievement. This high-tech approach, though, is the fruit of centuries of experimentation with inoculation, the artificial creation of immunity to contagious disease.
Apocalypse Then

Germ warfare: Weaponizing an illness is older than you might think

Conspiracy theorists believe the virus behind COVID-19 was intentionally leaked to cause destruction. Given that many people can carry the virus without symptoms, that's unlikely, writes Ainsley Hawthorn. All the same, history has much to teach us about how a sickness can turned into a weapon.
Apocalypse Then

The story behind the blistering speed of COVID-19 vaccine development

Before COVID-19, the fastest a vaccine had ever been developed was four years. In her latest Apocalypse Then column, Ainsley Hawthorn looks at how a past pandemic provided a huge head start for researchers.
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Learning a pandemic lesson: Here's one habit we now avoid like the plague

Though our responses to pandemics have been surprisingly consistent across time, we’ve left one long-standing public health measure in the past: the practice of marking the homes of the sick. 
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Why have Indigenous communities been hit harder by the pandemic than the population at large?

The impact of COVID-19 has not been equally felt across Canada. As Ainsley Hawthorn writes, this pandemic is far from the first in which Indigenous communities have borne a heavy burden.
Apocalypse Then

Think wearing masks in everyday life is a new concept? Think again

Wearing masks day in, day out may be new to most Canadians, but it's been part of everyday life in many East Asian countries for years.
Apocalypse Then

Writing in isolation: How pandemics can lead to wonderful art

Maybe we weren't quite as creative as we had hoped a year ago, writes Apocalypse Then columnist Ainsley Hawthorn. Still, history shows that prior pandemics helped foster many landmark works of art and literature.
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Plague upon the waters: How a disease-ridden steamboat spread yellow fever

When COVID-19 began to spread globally, the first large case cluster outside China wasn’t in another country. It was on a cruise ship: the Diamond Princess.
Apocalypse Then

An election in a pandemic? Let's take an old, old-school look at that

Newfoundland and Labrador is far from the only jurisdiction where a pandemic has affected the political process.
Apocalypse Then

Pandemics and labour: COVID-19 isn't the first time there's been upheaval at work

COVID-19 has sparked much conversation about labour, working conditions and fair pay, Ainsley Hawthorn writes in the latest segment of her Apocalypse Then series. It's not the first time the labour market has undergone dramatic change.
Apocalypse Then

Quack cures: How fraudulent claims and pandemics sadly go together

A carcass attracts vultures, and a catastrophe attracts profiteers, keen to exploit widespread suffering and anxiety, Ainsley Hawthorn writes.
Apocalypse Then

Health-care workers and everyday heroism: A case study in curbing disease

Six years ago, the staff at a single hospital were faced with a situation that would determine the fate of their country. In her latest Apocalypse Then column, Ainsley Hawthorn writes about the bravery of staff who dealt with an Ebola outbreak in Nigeria.
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Pandemic shaming is far from a new problem

COVID-shaming is a sad reality in this pandemic. But as contributor Ainsley Hawthorn writes, it's nothing new. It's common, she says, to blame people for getting sick.
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From hard pants to consumptive chic: How pandemics influence fashion

Fashion as we know it — clothing and cosmetic trends that change from year to year — was kick-started by a pandemic, writes Ainsley Hawthorn in the latest instalment of our Apocalypse Then series.
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The kids are all right: We can learn about resilience from children in earlier pandemics

Hong Kong schoolchildren living in the SARS outbreak of 2003 experienced all the restrictions that students in many places are facing right now.
Apocalypse Then

A brief history of bubbling: Why quarantine habits are much older than you might think

Since March, we've been slowly adapting to a new way of living. As Ainsley Hawthorn writes, there's a long, rich history in quarantines and managing disease.

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