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Women and Meth exhibit sheds light on recovering addicts

A new exhibit opening in Thunder Bay Friday night uses art to explore the stories of recovering meth addicts.

Exhibit inspired by Lakehead University research, aims to break down stigma

A piece of artwork at the Women and Meth exhibit informs the audience that despite a woman's dedication to repairing her life, she could not bridge the fissures that have been permanently formed. (Supplied by Pauline Sameshima)

A new exhibit opening in Thunder Bay Friday night uses art to explore the stories of recovering meth addicts.

The Women and Meth exhibit, based on a research project conducted at Lakehead University and Washington State University, aims to break down the stigma of addiction. 

(Peter Puna/Lakehead University)

Looking at addiction through an artistic lens can inspire social change, as well as help advance clinical change, said Pauline Sameshima, the Canada Research Chair in Arts Integrated Studies at Lakehead.

"If we could better understand what it means to experience recovery, I think that would make us kinder," she said.

"One of the most powerful things about art is that art speaks to people in different ways. And the addiction and recovery experiences are different for everybody."

The exhibit opens Friday at 7 p.m. at the Baggage Building Arts Centre at Marina Park. It runs until October 22. 

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